U.S national vacancy rates remain unchanged in Q4, says new survey

According to the U.S. Census Bureau  statistics for the 2016 vacancy rates, national vacancy rates in the fourth quarter 2016 were 6.9 percent for rental housing and 1.8 percent for homeowner housing.

The rental vacancy rate of 6.9 percent was not statistically different from the rate in the fourth quarter 2015 (7.0 percent) or the rate in the third quarter 2016 (6.8 percent). The homeowner vacancy rate of 1.8 percent was not statistically different from the rate in the fourth quarter 2015 (1.9 percent) or the rate in the third quarter 2016 (1.8 percent).

The homeownership rate of 63.7 percent was not statistically different from the rate in the fourth quarter 2015 (63.8 percent) or the rate in the third quarter 2016 (63.5 percent).

For rental housing by area, the fourth quarter 2016 vacancy rate was highest outside Metropolitan Statistical Areas (8.5 percent). The rates inside principal cities (7.0 percent) and in the suburbs (6.4 percent) were not statistically different from each other. The rental vacancy rates outside MSAs, inside principal cities and in the suburbs were not statistically different from the fourth quarter 2015 rates.

The homeowner vacancy rate was highest outside MSAs (2.7 percent), followed by inside principal cities (2.0 percent) and in the suburbs (1.5 percent). The homeowner vacancy rate outside MSAs was higher than the fourth quarter 2015 rate, while the rates inside principal cities and in the suburbs were not statistically different from the corresponding fourth quarter 2015 rates.

For the fourth quarter 2016, the rental vacancy rate was highest in the South (9.2 percent), followed by the Midwest (7.2 percent), Northeast (5.5 percent) and West (4.2 percent). The rental vacancy rate in the West was lower than the fourth quarter 2015 rate, while the rates in the Northeast, Midwest and South were not statistically different from the fourth quarter 2015 rates.

The homeowner vacancy rate was lowest in the West (1.3 percent). The rate in the South (2.2 percent) was higher than the rates in the Midwest (1.6 percent) and West, but not statistically different from the rate in the Northeast (1.8 percent). The homeowner vacancy rates in the Northeast, Midwest, South and West were not statistically different from the corresponding fourth quarter 2015 rates.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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